Ferries to Le Havre

Le Havre Offers

50% Off Caravans and Trailers

Free Caravans and trailers

Find out more

Portsmouth to Le Havre ferry route

Two operators cover the crossing from the UK to Le Havre. DFDS Seaways run daily return service from Portsmouth. The duration varies from 8 hours over-night to 5 hours on daytime crossing.

Brittany Ferries offer a fast craft ferry on this route that has a reduced crossing time of 3 hours and 45 minutes. They also have an economie service that runs Tuesday to Thursday.

Operator Frequency Duration
DFDS Seaways
Daily each way
8 hrs (Night)
5 hrs 30 mins (Day)
Bookit
Brittany Ferries (fast craft)
Thurs - Sun (May - Sept)
3 hrs 45 mins
Bookit
Brittany Ferries (Economie service)
Tues - Fri
5 hrs 30 mins
Bookit

Onboard Accommodation

The ferries to Le Harve which take 5 hours or more, there are cabins available, some outside and inside cabins. Some of the cabins are wheelchair accessible, others are also pet friendly cabins.

The longer ferry crossings also allow passengers to reserve seats, the fastcraft route does not have cabins on board but seats can be reserved.

Onboard Facilities and Information

All crossings offer a café and bar on board for refreshments and something to eat. The crossings over 5 hours also have a self service restaurant as well.

Pets are allowed on the crossing to Le Harve, however they must remain in the vehicle unless a pet friendly cabin has been purchased.

There are no pet friendly cabins on the fastcraft crossing to le Harve and pets must remain in the owner's vehicle.

Campsites near Le Havre

Campsite Distance from Le Havre ferry port
Le Brevedent, Normandy 24 miles Bookit
La Foret, Normandy 41 miles Bookit
Le Point du Jour, Normandy 52 miles Bookit
Les Mouettes, Normandy 57 miles Bookit

More about Le Havre

Le Havre is a port that sits at the mouth of the Seine, and has been long established as the harbour for Paris – indeed Le Havre is French for “the harbour”. Goods would reach Le Havre and be transferred to barges for the journey to the French capital down the Seine. Today Le Havre remains a popular arrival and departure point for people journeying to and from England.

The port of Le Havre suffered heavy bombing during Operation Overlord – the D-Day landings that took place in early June, 1944 – so much so that the city had to be completely rebuilt. The new Le Havre was designed by architect Auguste Perret, and construction took nearly two decades to complete. In 2005 Le Havre was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Whilst in Le Havre you cannot but fail to notice the huge St Joseph's Church, a tall tower that's lined with coloured glass and was personally designed by Perret. If less modern architecture appeals to you, then you should see the Maison de l'Armateur, close to the ferry port, which is one of the few old houses of Le Havre that was not destroyed in World War II. You can visit the St Vincent district for more of a sense of the old Le Havre.

Ferry Offer to Le Havre

Share this: